yeji-draws-yeti:

Jazz festival in the starry night

These are the ‘original versions’ of the poster series which I created for Jarasum international Jazz Festival this year.

  

the-zoo-keeper:

Ashley Bryan

the-zoo-keeper:

Ashley Bryan

princessecamcam:

J’ai reçu mes exemplaires de “la chèvre de Monsieur Seguin” !

La couv est trop flashi à mon goût… mais l’intérieur est super je suis très contente! Tout est fait en papier découpé bien sûr… Mais cette fois au lieu de dessiner au crayon à papier j’ai tout dessiné aux crayons de couleurs.

(via yohansacre)

franceskar:

(by Beth In Wonderland)

franceskar:

(by Beth In Wonderland)

(via chomiee-c)

i-love-art:

by Jonathan Burton

(via chomiee-c)

kritseldis:

Today is International Women’s Day!
Postcard by artist L.Härm, 1966

kritseldis:

Today is International Women’s Day!

Postcard by artist L.Härm, 1966

(via chomiee-c)

lindahall:

Prideaux John Selby - Scientist of the Day 

Prideaux John Selby, an English naturalist, was born July 23, 1788. In 1819, Selby began the task of compiling a set of illustrations of every bird found in the British Isles, drawn life-size. It would take him 14 years to finish the project, but when he was done, he had 218 beautiful plates depicting 280 species of birds, 110 of which he had seen on his own estate in Northumberland. Twizell House, as his home was called, was on the English coast just south of Scotland, and was a stopping point for any naturalist travelling between London and Edinburgh. One early visitor was John James Audubon, who dropped by in 1827, just after he had launched his Birds of America project and was seeking subscribers; the two became good friends.

Selby did his own drawings of birds, assisted by his brother-in-law, Captain Mitford, who also etched many of the plates (neither Selby nor Mitford knew anything about engraving or etching, so Mitford went to Newcastle to learn the art from the great John Bewick; Mitford then taught Selby). Selby’s finished publication, Illustrations of British Ornithology (1833) is a handsome set, with one large folio volume on land birds, and another on water birds. The images above show the black stork, common heron, northern loon, and the tawny owl.

We displayed Selby’s book in our 2009 exhibition, The Grandeur of Life: A Celebration of Charles Darwin and the Origin of Species. One of the images shown there, the little egret heron, is one of the most splendid bird paintings of the entire century, John Gould and Audubon notwithstanding.

Dr. William B. Ashworth, Jr., Consultant for the History of Science, Linda Hall Library and Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Missouri-Kansas City

(via scientificillustration)

theartofanimation:

Elliot Alfredius

(via fuckyeahillustrativeart)

nevver:

Affiches sérigraphiées, Virginie Morgand

(Source: virginie-morgand)

(Source: melba13, via chomiee-c)